City of Socorro Community Initiative
The City of Socorro Community Initiative (CSCI) is a new 501(c)3 public charity organization, established to solicit public and private financial support for a variety of public, charitable, and educational programs and projects in Socorro, Texas such as the full rehabilitation of the Rio Vista Farm National Historic Landmark, and the Socorro Youth in Culture (SY!C) afterschool art program for kids ages 5-17. The CSCI was formed in 2019 as a response to the lack of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) focused on the unique challenges facing the Socorro community. Although the Socorro community is the home of three National Register Sites, a National Historic Landmark nominated site, and off-reservation trust land for the only Pueblo community in the State of Texas, the Ysleta del Sur Pueblo, no museum or humanities facilities exist within the Socorro community. This project will increase humanities programming for underserved populations in Socorro, Texas and surrounding communities, and will make local history accessible to local community members as well as visitors from across the US-Mexico international border. The mission of the City of Socorro Community Initiative is to promote a dynamic quality of life through advancements in cultural heritage, community development, and health and wellness in Socorro, Texas.

Causes: Arts and Culture, Education, Health and Mental Well-being

Honoring the contributions of braceros to our shared bi-national history

Once completed, the Bracero Museum and Rio Vista Connections Tour will serve the local underserved community of Socorro, Texas, the national underrepresented Latino community, and the international community of the El Paso-Ciudad Juarez metroplex and visitors from Mexico. The Bracero Museum and Rio Vista Connections Tour will be accessible to international visitors from Mexico, many of whom were braceros or are the descendants of braceros. For the first time, a wide range of audiences will be able to visit the actual site where braceros arrived into the United States, were processed, and shipped to agricultural and railroad jobs throughout the country. Visitors will get to walk through the grounds and adobe rooms where hundreds of thousands of braceros slept, ate, signed contracts, waited, and dreamed of a better future for themselves and their families longing for their return in Mexico.

Our Progress
Our Goal $10,000
Total Amount Raised
-
Number of Donations
0
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